Proutypedia Style Guide

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The Proutypedia Style Guide is an abridged set of MediaWiki markups. This style guide is intended as a reference sheet to aid in creating and editing content. Use of this style guide will make formatting on Proutypedia consistent across all pages.

Starting an entry

Creating content on Proutypedia begins with opening a new entry. An entry may be started for the first time by navigating to a new entry that does not yet exist. In the following address:

http://proutypedia.com/wiki/Main_Page

replace the 'Main_Page' part of the address to the subject of the entry. For example:

http://proutypedia.com/wiki/new_entry

Hit 'return' and travel to the new page like you would any web page. Though you are trying to navigate to an entry that does not yet exist, Proutypedia will automatically take the name of the subject you wish to write about and create a provisional page for it. Click on the Create tab on the right. Proutypedia will give an edit box for the new entry into which new content will be put. One need only save the content for the new entry to exist within Proutypedia. (If one does not save the content, it will not stick.)

Please note that you cannot use spaces in the address. Where you would use a space, use an underscore instead.

Red Links

Likewise, if a red link exists to an entry that has not yet been created, clicking on the link will take you to where you can add new content. You will be sent directly to a new content box.

Structure of entries

Entries should feature a precis or summary at the start. Major sections should be given with a Level 2 heading (see below). A Table of Contents for each entry is automatically created when there are four or more headings.

Inside an entry

Basic Formatting

For bold, italic, headers, and other formatting, see below:

http://proutypedia.com/wiki/Proutypedia_Style_Guide#Proutypedia_formatting_markup

Quotes

Block quotes should be added using the following mark-up:

{{quote|text=sample block quote text}}

which produces this:

sample block quote text

Quotes can also be put inside a box using this format:

{{Quotation|Quoted material|Author|Title|Publication}}

which produces:

Quoted material

— Author, Title, Publication

The first "quote" tag should be used most of the time. The "Quotation" tag is more of an illustration or an image meant to capture the attention.

Proutypedia also uses Bq and Quote Box templates.

Linking to other Proutypedia entries

This example shows the text of an edit before clicking Save Page:

Prouty earned the position after nearly ten years in the Pentagon providing military support to [[CIA]] [[Special Operations#Special_Operations_and_Clandestine_Operations|clandestine operations]].

Putting a term in brackets tags it automatically as a link to a separate Proutypedia by the same name. When a term or article name has more than one word, the understore _ character is used instead of spaces. The second link above goes to the entry on Special Operations. Not only that, it links to a specific location in that entry: the special operations and clandestine operations section. The # symbol is used after the name of the entry to direct the browser to a specific section.

After the pipe character, the second part of the tag is what text is displayed to the reader. The end result is that the reader sees only the text "clandestine operations", and when it is clicked, the reader is taken to the Special Operations entry's subsection on clandestine operations.

Note that this is all case-sensitive.

Linking to other sites

Linking to external sites can be done three different ways.

1. Simply listing the website will produce a hyperlink:

http://www.prouty.org

2. Using brackets will convert the link to a numbered one. For example, putting the above address in brackets gives:

[1]

3. One can give a link to an external site, but instead of showing the URL, show the site name instead. For example:

[http://www.prouty.org The Col. L. Fletcher Prouty Reference Site]

produces:

The Official L. Fletcher Prouty Reference Site

Everything after the space following the URL will appear as text shown to the reader within the hyperlink. Text can then also be added before or after the brackets. For example:

[http://www.prouty.org Prouty.org] The Official L. Fletcher Prouty Reference Site

produces:

Prouty.org The Official L. Fletcher Prouty Reference Site

Citing Sources

To cite an online source in the body of an entry, follow this format:

<ref>[http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/feb/23/stop-female-scientists-written-out-wikipedia-history-royal-society-edit-athon www.theguardian.com "Stop female scientists being written out of Wikipedia history"] February 2014</ref>

Because Proutypedia and other Wikis are able to link directly to webpages used as sources, the citation style for Proutypedia articles is basic. In the example above, between the outer ref tags, there are four basic parts:

  • The real, complete URL that will direct the reader to the source once clicked
  • The simplified name of the website acting as source (e.g. www.yahoo.com) which is what is seen when the reader hovers over the superscript footnote number
  • The name of the online article itself cut-and-pasted into double quotes
  • The month and the year. The exact date is not necessary if it is given on the other website

When citing Wikipedia, since Wikipedia entries continually change, instead of the month and year above, the date format is: "Accessed 5-20-2014". The same goes for online articles and sources without a clear date of creation.

When citing books or print articles, the name of the book or magazine should come first, then the article name in quotes if applicable, the date of publication in parentheses, and the page number. Note that listing a reference mid-text is not the same as constructing a print bibliography for the end of an entry. When that is done, the user may use any accepted format (e.g. MLA).

If a source is likely to be cited more than once, instead of redoing the citation each time, Proutypedia allows a simplified version. The first time the source is cited, this format is followed:

<ref name="guard">[http://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/feb/23/stop-female-scientists-written-out-wikipedia-history-royal-society-edit-athon www.theguardian.com "Stop female scientists being written out of Wikipedia history"] February 2014</ref>

Note the first ref tag has changed. It now has a name="guard". Later this shortened name is used for later citations.

<ref name="guard" />

The above will add the proper citation without having to do the full initial format.

When all of the above information is supplied, it is automatically populated into the References section at the bottom of the entry, provided one also creates the References section doing this:

==References==

<references />

NOTE: At present, the Cite template (e.g. Cite news, etc.) is producing script errors. Editors are encouraged until the problem is resolved to stick with the simplified reference markup language above.


Proutypedia formatting markup


Description You type You get
Character (inline) formatting – applies anywhere
Italic text
''italic''

italic

Bold text
'''bold'''

bold

Section formatting – only at the beginning of the line
Headings of different levels

== Level 2 ==

=== Not used ===

==== Level 4 ====

===== Not used =====

====== Level 6 ======


Level 2


Level 4


Level 6
Horizontal rule
Text before
----
Text after

Text before


Text after

Bullet list
* Start each line
* with an [[Wikipedia:asterisk|asterisk]] (*).
** More asterisks give deeper
*** and deeper levels.
* Line breaks <br />don't break levels.
*** But jumping levels creates empty space.
Any other start ends the list.
  • Start each line
  • with an asterisk (*).
    • More asterisks give deeper
      • and deeper levels.
  • Line breaks
    don't break levels.
      • But jumping levels creates empty space.

Any other start ends the list.

Numbered list
# Start each line
# with a [[Wikipedia:Number_sign|number sign]] (#).
## More number signs give deeper
### and deeper
### levels.
# Line breaks <br />don't break levels.
### But jumping levels creates empty space.
# Blank lines

# end the list and start another.
Any other start also
ends the list.
  1. Start each line
  2. with a number sign (#).
    1. More number signs give deeper
      1. and deeper
      2. levels.
  3. Line breaks
    don't break levels.
      1. But jumping levels creates empty space.
  4. Blank lines
  1. end the list and start another.

Any other start also ends the list.

Definition list
;item 1
: definition 1
;item 2
: definition 2-1
: definition 2-2
item 1
definition 1
item 2
definition 2-1
definition 2-2
Indent text
: Single indent
:: Double indent
::::: Multiple indent

This workaround may harm accessibility.
Single indent
Double indent
Multiple indent